The short answer is yes, it could. Complications that can arise from induced abortion, such as infection and damage to the uterus, are the main cause of future risk to women.

In the case of medical abortion, the risks for these complications are increased  in women who have a high risk of uterine rupture; an intrauterine device (IUD) in place; uncontrolled high blood pressure; diabetes, certain heart or blood vessel diseases; severe liver, kidney or lung disease; take a blood thinner or certain steroid medications; or smoke heavily.2

First-trimester surgical abortion by dilation and curettage (D&C) “can result in uterine synechiae (or Asherman’s Syndrome), which increase the risk of subsequent midtrimester spontaneous abortions and low birthweight deliveries.”3  Incompetent cervix is also a preterm birth risk associated with surgical abortion. “Symptoms related to cervical incompetence were found among 75% of women who undergo forced dilation for abortion.”4

With any type of abortion, “if the abortion is infected or complicated by pre-existing and nontreated STDs, risks of secondary infertility, ectopic pregnancy, and fetal loss increase.”5  Studies have consistently shown that induced abortion increases the incidence of subsequent preterm delivery and also depression6, which can ultimately effect a woman’s decision to have more children in the future. (For more on how STDs can complicate abortion, read "Will Your Body Pay for an Abortion?")

There is much research that still needs to be done on this topic.  “Despite strong recommendations for substantive research, and the clear need for women to have accurate information as they execute their autonomy, current data remain sparse, studies are small and methodologically flawed, and the conclusions are often intertwined with the political agendas of their authors and publishers.”1

CompassCare is a non-profit organization providing non-biased information that supports a woman’s truly informed choice.  For caring, confidential support and professional medical services, schedule a free consultation today.

  1. Obstetrical & Gynecological Survey: January 2003 - Volume 58 - Issue 1 - pp 67-79. Long-Term Physical and Psychological Health Consequences of Induced Abortion: Review of the Evidence. http://journals.lww.com/obgynsurvey/Abstract/2003/01000/Long_Term_Physical_and_Psychological_Health.23.aspx
  2. The Mayo Clinic (2010). Medical Abortion, Risks. Retrieved from: http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/medical-abortion/MY00819/DSECTION=risks
  3. The Global Library of Women's Medicine. (2011). Long-Term Risks of Surgical Abortion. Carol J. Hogue, PhD, MPH. Terry Professor of Matrenal/Child Health, Professor of Epidemiology, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta, Georga (Vol 6, Cap 124).  Retrieved from: http://www.glowm.com/index.html?p=glowm.cml/section_view&articleid=440
  4. Dr. Ren, “Cervical Incompetence - Aetiology and Management”, Medical Journal of Australia (December 29, 1993), Volume 60. Retrieved from: http://www.gargaro.com/healthproblems.html
  5. The Global Library of Women's Medicine. (2011). Long-Term Risks of Surgical Abortion. Carol J. Hogue, PhD, MPH. Terry Professor of Matrenal/Child Health, Professor of Epidemiology, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta, Georga (Vol 6, Cap 124).  Retrieved from: http://www.glowm.com/index.html?p=glowm.cml/section_view&articleid=440
  6. Obstetrical & Gynecological Survey: January 2003 - Volume 58 - Issue 1 - pp 67-79. Long-Term Physical and Psychological Health Consequences of Induced Abortion: Review of the Evidence. http://journals.lww.com/obgynsurvey/Abstract/2003/01000/Long_Term_Physical_and_Psychological_Health.23.aspx